It’s simple.


Every baby needs a quilt.


Some babies never grow very big, so their quilts are little.


But they are important, and mommies and daddies will never forget them.


So the mommies and daddies can hold onto the quilts, and love, and remember.

I hate Hate HATE miscarriage. Another sweet friend of mine lost a wanted child. This is the quilt I made for her, just about 18 inches square. (My toddler “helped” with the pictures!)

I want to make more of these. I have many friends who have struggled with losing their babies, and I have seen how powerful it is to validate and acknowledge those little lives – these children are real; they lived; they were loved; they matter; they are missed. There is no expiration date on grief, but the only thing I know to do is say, “I have not gone through what you are experiencing, but I am here with you, and I am hurting with you, too.”

Quilts heal.

Every year I make Christmas gifts for the family, usually on a theme. This year, I wanted to make a small difference in the amount of textile waste that accumulates in our nation. Rather than buying new fabric, I found some large men’s shirts at a thrift shop and used those as my source material. A few extra scraps were added in (like the red linen and Star Wars print), but the rest of the cotton and linen were repurposed.


Couples and families got tea towels made from the fronts and backs of the shirts. I played around with little Dresden plates to evoke snowflakes or poinsettias! The blue one went to my brother and comes from my late Grandfather. The linen shirt was first used in a quilt made for my son. I felt my brother would appreciate the sentiment and style. The other blue rosette went to my parents for a similar reason – and the contrasting “petal” was a scrap from my son’s outfit he wore home from the hospital!


I have a few unmarried brothers-in-law who I didn’t think would appreciate holiday towels. Instead, I turned a fine cotton shirt into bow ties for them! I almost couldn’t bear to cut into the shirt. The pattern matching and detail were exquisite! But I am glad I did – the bow ties turned out so nicely! My brother got one of these as well, and as he is such a sharp dresser, I also made a hand-rolled matching handkerchief (or pocket square). The brother-in-law who received the Star Wars bow tie had instructions to open it before going to see Rogue One. If we lived closer, I know we would have enjoyed seeing it together.

Being apart at the holidays isn’t our favorite, but I hope it’s made a little sweeter with lovingly made and thought-through gifts!

Hoping you feel loved and cherished this holiday season!

I have not been blogging my sewing as I prepare for the holidays because I’m not sure who would peek! But there are a few things I’ve sewn and sent to friends in England, and as they’ve arrived already, I am free to tell the interwebs!


I actually cannibalized an unfinished quilt that just wasn’t working for me. These two quarter dresdens were salvageable and perfect for the personalities of two friends in Sunderland. I turned them into quilted cushion covers! My friends live in the same flat, so if these go in a sofa, they coordinate!


The other gift is actually a collaborative project for friends getting married this week! My accomplice across the pond made six large star blocks with a grey background using greens and blues. I sent along a little navy floral print for binding along with the batting, so once the two sets of stars come together, they will make a lovely little wedding throw! I think it’s appropriate that this quilt is being made on two continents as the couple are also international. I can’t wait to see it all done!

Hoping everyone likes their gifts and that they feel love from the sunny south!

I’d like to think I’ll make a Jayne hat every year for my child until he’s old enough to question it.


He remains less than thrilled about keeping it on his head, but I’m happy with it! This time I used a knitting loom for the main hat and crocheted the ear flaps. How does it sit? Pretty cunning, doncha think?

This is a short story, a sad story and a happy one.

Several years ago I became friends with a family of four. Eventually, my then-boyfriend met them, too. Their children were part of our wedding. We started meeting at their house a few times a month with other young couples.

Then babies started happening. There was one due in June, one in July, one in August (ours!), one in September, and one in October – one per family, all in a row!


It was wonderful being pregnant with friends. We shared joys and tears, ate whatever we wanted while we could keep it down, and we dreamed together about our children.

Then we got the news:  October Baby didn’t make it out of the first trimester. It was our friends’ baby, the one whose siblings were in our wedding.

We mourned, we wept, we supported.


Months passed, and the babies started coming. Finally, my child arrived. When our friends came to visit at the hospital, they had news:  they were pregnant again!

I wish I could say this baby went full term, but she did not. Again, we mourned, we cried, we believed this was not the end of the story.


When I learned Esther was on her way, I determined to do something special. I came up with a design using forty sawtooth stars in 3 sizes. Every week, I made a star and prayed for Esther in her mother’s womb.


I was finishing the binding when she arrived, perfect and full term and beautiful. Her presence does not make up for the pain of her lost siblings, but we are all so thankful she is here, and we love her so very much!

For the full story, including some very real and powerful vulnerability on the part of Esther’s mama, see the blog at shaileyratliff.com

This is a sad story.


It’s a story of a little one who was loved and hoped-for…


…All the days of his life.

His mama was overjoyed to learn he was there. She cried when she told me. I cried, too. J’s sister hadn’t made it out of the first trimester. I didn’t know her, but I began praying for him. Each week I made a pinwheel block. I planned to vary the sizes. 

But then I got word. At eleven weeks, they couldn’t find his heartbeat. He only measured seven weeks. We were heartbroken!

His mama started going for long hikes while his father was away on tour. I finished his quilt – so much smaller than we hoped for!


I can’t write this without tears in my eyes. My one-year-old naps beside me, but instead I think of his would-be friend. I think of my dear friend, mother of two but unable to hold either. There are no words, no ways to make it better. But I’m still here, sad and grieving, too. And J still has a quilt, because he matters, he is loved, and he is missed.

I’m not one to create whole quilts from a single fabric designer, but this one is the exception!


It started with a Denyse Schmidt charm pack purchased in postpartum delirium. In the chaos of first-time motherhood, through emotions and hormones and sleeplessness, I needed a straightforward project, an anchor for my soul, my me-ness, something to get me sewing. 


The great thing about Denyse Schmidt is that her fabric lines tend to blend well together. I pulled all the bits and pieces I had in my stash, adding a few solids (of which I keep little on hand), and cut 5-inch squares. I could sit on the couch, newborn asleep across my lap, and play with matching prints to solids or sketching half-square triangle layouts. 



I call it “Transitions”. It speaks of the journey into motherhood, the way some things change and others stay the same at their core. I finished it with a grey Lotta Jansdotter binding and chunks of vintage sheets in the backing. It measures 49×56 inches. 

And this time, I’m not cropping out the quilt holder. Those hands held me as I fell to pieces, and those feet paced the wee hours with our swaddled son, and that heart encouraged me and did his best to understand. It has taken time, but we have come through it a family, bound together and beautiful, reflecting effort well-spent and growing love. 

It’s pieces like these that make me so thankful for the luxury of being a quilter, that I have the ability to distill these bits of soul into practical, wonderful works. I can look at this quilt and remember how very hard those first months were, but they became something lovely after all.

Recently two friends of mine came to the conclusion that it is time to sell their home of over a decade. Many times I have been on the receiving end of their generous hospitality, so I wanted to make a gift for each to reflect all the love and memories of that home.


I started with sketches of the house itself.


I thought of the nonhuman residents as well.


Then it was just a matter of raw-edged appliqué, a bit of decorative stitching, turning under the blocks’ edges, and fitting them to embroidery hoop “frames”.

Sometimes I love a gift more in the making than the person receiving, but I could tell this time that wasn’t the case. Hoping that as time goes by, these little mementos will bring back sweet memories!

I’ve been neglecting my blog – but not my 10-month-old! We have been so busy crawling, cruising, eating, climbing, clinging, investigating – and napping in 30-minute stretches – that it’s all I can do some days to sew a stitch, much less document it. This little project came together so quickly that it’s worth a nap to write it up! The idea came from our first trip to the pool this summer and a need for an easy way to dry off the Squish!For one baby beach kimono, you will need:

  • Two microfiber kitchen towels, about 15×25 inches (I got mine from the dollar store!)
  • Sewing machine, scissors, pins, and thread

That’s it!


Pre-wash your towels if you’d like (I did), then cut one in half width-wise. You now have two rectangles 15×12.5 inches.

Turn the cut end under about 1/4 inch and pin. This will be the center opening of your kimono.


Zigzag stitch over the raw edge. Or, if you’d like, turn the edge in once more and straight stitch. Either way is fine!


With right sides together, pin the cut rectangles to the second, whole towel. Pin straight across the top, but only pin halfway up the side. Be as precise as you choose! (I just found the center by folding and marking loosely with a finger.)


Sew along the top and two sides with a straig stitch, leaving the armholes open. Sew as close to the original hemmed edge as possible, or even catching into it. Then just turn it inside out…


And plop it on the nearest baby! (Bonus points if you’ve matched it to the baby’s eyes!) Size-wise, it ought to do for a child age 6 months up to at least 18 months.

Now to slather on the SPF and hit the water! Happy summer, y’all!

Oh, this one was long in the making.

  
I began cutting early last year.

  
It was my in-between project, something to do just a bit on as I stitched other, more pressing pieces.

   
 
I didn’t bother calculating the hours or the amount of fabric used.

  
I just went with my guts, and more and more meaning came to be as I worked.

  
Even the final detail – going back through and hand-tying each block – was important, solidifying. (Photo is blown out on purpose – it’s so hard to see the black-on-black otherwise!)

  
The back has as much significance as the front. It references adventures together, cities and firsts-of-its-kind, extravagance of hard-to-find hoarded yards (yep, that’s Jay McCarroll in there!), colors of rust and fire and hipsterrific flesh tones. 

  
That’s 80 blocks total, finishing at 60×75 inches post-wash. I love every bit of it, and even more the friend who owns it now.

Although she and I used to run in the same circles, hopping the Pond together on more than one occasion, it is harder and harder for our lives to intersect in person. Thus, when we finally found time to get out in the woods together, I knew I had to finish in time. I asked her to help me hold the quilt while I took pictures. It wasn’t until I asked her to find the dedication did she realize it was for her!

  
And it just happened to be National Quilting Day! Such a precious, unforgettable way to celebrate!

This quilt is entitled “Ex –> Plus / Inheritance” because it is a directive over her life:  every place that has been an “ex” is being transformed into something positive, every place someone has judged her or cut her off or used her badly is turning into beauty that is firm and lasting. And this is the inheritance she is building for future generations. I am so thankful to be part of her story, so glad she has not only a tangible representation of my love for her but of the Great Love, in whom we live and move and have our beings, who orders our steps and redeems even the greatest pains.